Today in Labor History
Today in labor history, September 8, 1909:  Following a brutal strike in which hundreds were injured and dozens killed, workers at the Pressed Steel Car Co. plant – called “The Slaughterhouse” because there were so many deaths on the job (an average of one a day) – in McKees Rock, Pennsylvania, go back to work after the company agrees to a wage increase, posting pay scales, and eliminating graft in job assignments.  [Photo:  The Pittsburgh Press published this image of Frank Hoffstot, president of the company, urging him to meet and negotiate with the 6,000 striking workers.] 

Today in labor history, September 8, 1909:  Following a brutal strike in which hundreds were injured and dozens killed, workers at the Pressed Steel Car Co. plant – called “The Slaughterhouse” because there were so many deaths on the job (an average of one a day) – in McKees Rock, Pennsylvania, go back to work after the company agrees to a wage increase, posting pay scales, and eliminating graft in job assignments.  [Photo:  The Pittsburgh Press published this image of Frank Hoffstot, president of the company, urging him to meet and negotiate with the 6,000 striking workers.] 

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    Once again the rich labor history from the place I was born and raised until the age of 9. McKees Rocks was a vibrant...
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