Today in Labor History
Today in labor history, October 18, 1927:  8,400 coal miners across Colorado go on strike, shutting down the majority of mines in the state.  Five weeks into the strike, Columbine – one of the few towns with a mine still open using scab labor – became the scene of a massacre when police and militia opened fire on miners attempting to enter the town.  Six people were killed and over sixty injured, many severely.

Today in labor history, October 18, 1927:  8,400 coal miners across Colorado go on strike, shutting down the majority of mines in the state.  Five weeks into the strike, Columbine – one of the few towns with a mine still open using scab labor – became the scene of a massacre when police and militia opened fire on miners attempting to enter the town.  Six people were killed and over sixty injured, many severely.

  1. upst8ofmind reblogged this from s0c1al1sm
  2. whtwlf reblogged this from wavesinjuly
  3. silas216 reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  4. nugschillinandgrindage reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  5. nikko-andtheleft reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  6. wateringgoodseeds reblogged this from s0c1al1sm
  7. rabbitring reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  8. un-tipo-ahi reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  9. s0c1al1sm reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  10. wavesinjuly reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  11. todayinlaborhistory posted this
Blog comments powered by Disqus