Today in Labor History
Today in labor history, September 9, 1919: 1,100 Boston Police Department officers go out on strike over union recognition, wages, and working conditions. Governor Calvin Coolidge called out the entire state militia and used his authority to fire everyone on strike, replacing almost the entire department with soldiers recently returned from World War I – at higher wages and with better working conditions.

Today in labor history, September 9, 1919: 1,100 Boston Police Department officers go out on strike over union recognition, wages, and working conditions. Governor Calvin Coolidge called out the entire state militia and used his authority to fire everyone on strike, replacing almost the entire department with soldiers recently returned from World War I – at higher wages and with better working conditions.

  1. historgasm reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
  2. crashcartcannibal reblogged this from thisweekinpoliceviolence and added:
    Coolidge later became president…fucking fascist puppets
  3. thisweekinpoliceviolence reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory and added:
    "Police unions" don’t count as real unions, for the record. This is still some mad interesting history, of course.
  4. sustainableprosperity reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory
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  16. snake-mama reblogged this from todayinlaborhistory and added:
    Scabs with guns. What an image.
  17. todayinlaborhistory posted this
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