Today in Labor History
Today in labor history, September 16, 2004: The Farm Labor Organizing Committee signs a collective bargaining agreement with Mt. Olive Pickle Company and its growers, ending a successful five-year long nationwide boycott. The contract – which covered workers on more than 1,000 North Carolina farms who had previously been paid piece rate and worked and lived under deplorable conditions – marked the first time a U.S. labor union represented guest workers.

Today in labor history, September 16, 2004: The Farm Labor Organizing Committee signs a collective bargaining agreement with Mt. Olive Pickle Company and its growers, ending a successful five-year long nationwide boycott. The contract – which covered workers on more than 1,000 North Carolina farms who had previously been paid piece rate and worked and lived under deplorable conditions – marked the first time a U.S. labor union represented guest workers.

Today in labor history, July 22, 1887: Brewers and brewery workers in San Francisco sign their first collective bargaining agreement, bringing to a close a strike and successful boycott which had lasted several months. The agreement included a closed shop, sick leave, a 10-hour day, minimum wages, overtime pay, and “free beer in moderation while at work.”

Today in labor history, July 22, 1887: Brewers and brewery workers in San Francisco sign their first collective bargaining agreement, bringing to a close a strike and successful boycott which had lasted several months. The agreement included a closed shop, sick leave, a 10-hour day, minimum wages, overtime pay, and “free beer in moderation while at work.”

Today in labor history, May 29, 1996:  The United Farm Workers and Bruce Church, Inc. — the nation’s third largest lettuce grower — reach an agreement on a contract, ending seventeen years of boycotts, litigation, and conflict.

Today in labor history, May 29, 1996:  The United Farm Workers and Bruce Church, Inc. — the nation’s third largest lettuce grower — reach an agreement on a contract, ending seventeen years of boycotts, litigation, and conflict.

Today in labor history, April 30, 1963: Inspired by the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a group of West Indians in Bristol, England, organize a boycott of the Bristol Omnibus Company for its refusal to employ non-white workers on its buses. The boycott lasted for four months until the company reversed its discriminatory hiring practice.

Today in labor history, April 30, 1963: Inspired by the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a group of West Indians in Bristol, England, organize a boycott of the Bristol Omnibus Company for its refusal to employ non-white workers on its buses. The boycott lasted for four months until the company reversed its discriminatory hiring practice.

Today in labor history, September 16, 2004:  The Farm Labor Organizing Committee signs a collective bargaining agreement with Mt. Olive Pickle Company and its growers, ending a successful five-year long nationwide boycott.  The contract – which covered workers on more than 1,000 North Carolina farms who had previously been paid piece rate and worked and lived under deplorable conditions – marked the first time a U.S. labor union represented guest workers.  

Today in labor history, September 16, 2004:  The Farm Labor Organizing Committee signs a collective bargaining agreement with Mt. Olive Pickle Company and its growers, ending a successful five-year long nationwide boycott.  The contract – which covered workers on more than 1,000 North Carolina farms who had previously been paid piece rate and worked and lived under deplorable conditions – marked the first time a U.S. labor union represented guest workers.  

Today in labor history, July 29, 1970:  After five years of strikes and boycotts, table grape growers in California sign their first collective bargaining agreement with the United Farm Workers.  The contract—which covered over 10,000 workers—ended labor contracting and established seniority and hiring rights; included an immediate wage increase; and provided for fresh water and toilets in the fields, and a medical plan.   

Today in labor history, July 29, 1970:  After five years of strikes and boycotts, table grape growers in California sign their first collective bargaining agreement with the United Farm Workers.  The contract—which covered over 10,000 workers—ended labor contracting and established seniority and hiring rights; included an immediate wage increase; and provided for fresh water and toilets in the fields, and a medical plan.   

Today in labor history, July 22, 1887:  Brewers and brewery workers in San Francisco sign their first collective bargaining agreement, bringing to a close a strike and successful boycott which had lasted several months.  The agreement included a closed shop, sick leave, a 10-hour day, minimum wages, overtime pay, and “free beer in moderation while at work.”  

Today in labor history, July 22, 1887:  Brewers and brewery workers in San Francisco sign their first collective bargaining agreement, bringing to a close a strike and successful boycott which had lasted several months.  The agreement included a closed shop, sick leave, a 10-hour day, minimum wages, overtime pay, and “free beer in moderation while at work.”  

Today in labor history, May 11, 1894:  With their wages slashed and no reduction in rent at the company housing, Pullman Palace Car Company factory workers walk off the job.  The workers sought the support of the American Railway Union, which gave notice in June that its members would no longer work trains that included Pullman cars.  The strike and boycott crippled railway traffic nationwide and at its peak involved 250,000+ workers in 27 states.  

Today in labor history, May 11, 1894:  With their wages slashed and no reduction in rent at the company housing, Pullman Palace Car Company factory workers walk off the job.  The workers sought the support of the American Railway Union, which gave notice in June that its members would no longer work trains that included Pullman cars.  The strike and boycott crippled railway traffic nationwide and at its peak involved 250,000+ workers in 27 states.  

Today in labor history, April 30, 1963:  Inspired by the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a group of West Indians in Bristol, England, organize a boycott of the Bristol Omnibus Company for its refusal to employ non-white workers on its buses.  The boycott lasted for four months until the company reversed its discriminatory hiring practice. 

Today in labor history, April 30, 1963:  Inspired by the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a group of West Indians in Bristol, England, organize a boycott of the Bristol Omnibus Company for its refusal to employ non-white workers on its buses.  The boycott lasted for four months until the company reversed its discriminatory hiring practice.