Today in Labor History
Today in labor history, March 2, 1937:  U.S. Steel signs its first collective bargaining agreement with the Steelworkers Organizing Committee (SWOC), averting a strike. The agreement included a substantial wage hike; an eight-hour day and forty-hour week, with overtime; seniority protection; a grievance procedure; and full recognition of SWOC as the workers’ bargaining agent.

Today in labor history, March 2, 1937:  U.S. Steel signs its first collective bargaining agreement with the Steelworkers Organizing Committee (SWOC), averting a strike. The agreement included a substantial wage hike; an eight-hour day and forty-hour week, with overtime; seniority protection; a grievance procedure; and full recognition of SWOC as the workers’ bargaining agent.

Today in labor history, July 31, 1999:  The Great Shipyard Strike of 1999 ends after steelworkers at Newport News Shipbuilding Inc. ratify a breakthrough agreement which nearly doubles pensions, increases security, ends inequality, and provides the highest wage increases in company and industry history to nearly 10,000 workers.  The strike lasted over 16 weeks.

Today in labor history, July 31, 1999:  The Great Shipyard Strike of 1999 ends after steelworkers at Newport News Shipbuilding Inc. ratify a breakthrough agreement which nearly doubles pensions, increases security, ends inequality, and provides the highest wage increases in company and industry history to nearly 10,000 workers.  The strike lasted over 16 weeks.

Today in labor history, April 8, 1952:  The day before a nationwide steelworkers’ strike was set to begin, President Harry S. Truman orders his Secretary of Commerce to seize control of the nation’s steel mills to keep them in production for the Korean War effort.  On June 2, the Supreme Court ruled against the president.

Today in labor history, April 8, 1952:  The day before a nationwide steelworkers’ strike was set to begin, President Harry S. Truman orders his Secretary of Commerce to seize control of the nation’s steel mills to keep them in production for the Korean War effort.  On June 2, the Supreme Court ruled against the president.