Today in Labor History
Today in labor history, January 13, 1874:  As 7,000+ workers demonstrate in New York City’s Tompkins Square Park for unemployment relief, mounted police charge into the crowd, beating men, women, and children with billy clubs. Future American Federation of Labor (AFL) President Samuel Gompers, who was at the demonstration, described the police attack as “an orgy of brutality.”

Today in labor history, January 13, 1874:  As 7,000+ workers demonstrate in New York City’s Tompkins Square Park for unemployment relief, mounted police charge into the crowd, beating men, women, and children with billy clubs. Future American Federation of Labor (AFL) President Samuel Gompers, who was at the demonstration, described the police attack as “an orgy of brutality.”

Today in labor history, August 5, 1931:  Fifteen hundred jobless men storm the plant of the Fruit Growers’ Express Company in Indiana Harbor, Indiana, demanding that they be given jobs to keep them from starving.  The company responded by calling the police, who arrived with clubs and dispersed the men.  [Photo:  publicity still of Richard Barthlemass in William Wellman’s Heroes for Sale (1933).]

Today in labor history, August 5, 1931:  Fifteen hundred jobless men storm the plant of the Fruit Growers’ Express Company in Indiana Harbor, Indiana, demanding that they be given jobs to keep them from starving.  The company responded by calling the police, who arrived with clubs and dispersed the men.  [Photo:  publicity still of Richard Barthlemass in William Wellman’s Heroes for Sale (1933).]

Today in labor history, March 6, 1930:  Hundreds of thousands of people in major cities around the world—including 30 cities here in the U.S.—take to the streets to protest mass unemployment caused by the Great Depression.   

Today in labor history, March 6, 1930:  Hundreds of thousands of people in major cities around the world—including 30 cities here in the U.S.—take to the streets to protest mass unemployment caused by the Great Depression.